Friday Finds
friday finds , memes / June 4, 2010

Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading. Below are a few of the great books that I found/discovered this week. One day, I shall hunt them down and devour them! Sweetness in the Belly Author: Camilla Gibb Published: 2007 About: “While Kate Reading has a beautiful narrator’s voice, low and lilting, dramatic and enticing, her characterizations are problematic. She often uses an annoying little-girl voice for protagonist Lilly, a white Western woman raised in a Moroccan shrine as a devout Muslim, living through the 1970s among Ethiopian Muslims who consider her a “forenji” (foreigner) despite her Arabic fluency and her Islamic piety. Reading also casts many of the Ethiopian women in a harsh, high range that makes them sound rather silly. Still, this is an engrossing listen because the novel is well written and timely. Gibb’s prose rhythms are lovely, her language sensuous, her images vivid and her story of love doomed by political reality dramatic and moving. We move back and forth between the daily routines of deeply devoted families in Harar in the 1970s as Ethiopia disintegrates, and of the exile community in London in the ’80s as Lilly awaits word of her Sudanese…

WoW: Nomansland
memes , waiting on wednesday / June 2, 2010

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Breaking the Spine. This week’s pre-publication “can’t-wait-to-read” selection is: Nomansland Author: Lesley Hauge Publication Date: June 22nd, 2010 Publisher: Berkley Trade Genre: Fiction About: “Sometime in the future, after devastating wars and fires, a lonely, windswept island in the north is populated solely by women. Among these women is a group of teenaged Trackers—expert equestrians and archers—whose job is to protect their shores from the enemy. The enemy, they’ve been told, is men. When these girls come upon a partially buried home from the distant past, they are fascinated by the strange objects—high-heeled shoes, teen magazines, make-up—found there.  What are they to make of these mysterious things, which introduce a world they have never known? And what does it mean for their strict society where friendship is forbidden and rules must be obeyed—at all costs? Reminiscent of The Giver but with a feminist twist, Nomansland is a powerful, shocking story that will challenge young readers’ perspectives and provoke much discussion over the timely and controversial issues presented.” (Publisher Summary)

Friday Finds
friday finds , memes / May 28, 2010

Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading. Below are a few of the great books that I found/discovered this week. One day, I shall hunt them down and devour them! Ten Things I Hate About Me Author: Randa Abdel-Fattah Published: 2009 (2010 in Canada) About: “Jamie just wants to fit in. She doesn”t want to be seen as a stereotypical Muslim girl named Jamilah, so she does everything possible to hide that part of herself, even if it means keeping her friends at a distance. But when the cutest boy in school asks her out and her friends start to wonder about her life outside of school, suddenly her secrets are threatened. Jamie has to figure out how to be both Jamie and Jamilah before she loses everything…” (Product Description) “Jamilah Towfeek hides her Lebanese-Muslim background from the other kids at her Australian school “to avoid people assuming I fly planes into buildings as a hobby.” She dyes her hair blonde, wears blue contacts and stands by when popular kids make racist remarks. Passing as “Jamie” is fraught with difficulties: she can’t invite friends to her house, lies to cover up her widower dad’s strict rules…

Friday Finds
friday finds , memes / May 21, 2010

Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading. Below are a few of the great books that I found/discovered this week. One day, I shall hunt them down and devour them! The Night Counter Author: Alia Yunis Published: 2009 About: “In this captivating debut, Yunis takes readers on a magic carpet ride examining the lives of Fatima Abdullah and her huge dysfunctional family. Imitating Scheherazade, Fatima—in a clever twist—spins her own tales to the legendary storyteller. And she has plenty of material: Fatima is dying, and more interested in her prized possessions—including a house in Lebanon—than in reuniting her splintered offspring and her estranged husband, Ibraham, whose enduring love is proved in a neat twist at the end of the novel. Fatima’s family is all over the country, all with issues, including daughter Laila battling breast cancer in Detroit, openly gay actor grandson Amir in Los Angeles and pregnant great-granddaughter Aisha in Minneapolis. Gradually, Fatima learns that her true treasure isn’t the house in Lebanon that she’s pined after for decades, but her imperfect, loving family. Add in a bumbling neophyte FBI agent seeing al-Qaeda smoke where there is no fire and the result is a sometimes…

Friday Finds
friday finds , memes / May 14, 2010

Friday Finds is a weekly meme hosted by Should Be Reading. Below are a few of the great books that I found/discovered this week. One day, I shall hunt them down and devour them! Bachelor Girl: 100 Years of Breaking the Rules – a Social History of Living Single Author: Betsy Israel Published: 2002 About: “Journalist Betsy Israel paints remarkably vivid portraits of single women — and how they have been perceived — throughout the decades using primary sources, including private journals, newspapers, and other materials from popular media. From the nineteenth-century spinsters of New England to the Bowery girls of New York City, to the career girls of the 1950s and 1960s, single women have fought to find, and feel comfortable in, that room of their own. One need only look at Bridget Jones and the Sex and the City gang to see that single women still maintain an uneasy relationship with the rest of society — and yet radiate glamour and mystery. Bachelor Girl shines a light on the stereotypes that have stigmatized single women and celebrates their resourceful sense of spirit, enterprise, and unlimited success in a world where it is no longer unusual or unlikely to…