Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation (Review)

What I like most about Pollan’s writing is that he works off the assumption that people generally want to know more about food. We might not want to be gourmet chefs anytime soon, but as a reader of his books, obviously I’m interested in learning more about what we as a society put into our bodies, and what place food and cooking serves in our lives.

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Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal (Review)

Having said that, I have to admit that I didn’t find this book quite as appealing as Stiff or Bonk. I thought that, since the subject of food interests me, I might find Gulp to be more interesting … but alas, that was not the case. I don’t think it’s because Roach did any less of a great job with Gulp than with her previous books.

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Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It’s So Hard to Think Straight About Animals (Review)

One of the things that I’ve found challenging as I’ve started to travel around the world more, and to eat the food of other cultures, is that the animals we consider “food” or “pets” do not always fit in the same categories for other people. I always knew this intellectually, but there’s something about going to a market and finding rabbit for sale, seeing a camel burger on a menu, or living in a country where dogs are simply not considered worthy of being pets to make you realize that it’s more than just theory.

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It Starts With Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways (Review)

This book explains why so many people choose to eat this way, and how it can benefit you and your body. You may or may not agree with the principles behind it, but if you are looking for an explanation of why people do it, you could do worse than to read It Starts With Food.

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