Planet Pregnancy (Review)

June 18, 2010

Book cover for "Planet Pregnancy" by Linda Oatman High.Title: Planet Pregnancy

Author: Linda Oatman High

Publication Year: 2010

Pages: 197

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult

Source: Borrowed from the library at my school

From the cover:

It’s September tenth and
I’m holding my breath
because life
and death
and everything
in-between
depends
on a stick
dipped
for less than
ten seconds
in a dish
of pee.

This book was awesome!

I gotta tell you, Planet Pregnancy is the first book that I’ve read that’s written completely in poetry. Most of it isn’t rhyming verse – just free form like the part above – but it’s definitely poetic.

Here’s a little bit more detail, since the book cover doesn’t really explain much about the plot: 16-year-old Sahara finds out that she’s pregnant, and then has to decide whether or not to keep the baby, as well as when and how to tell her mother and the child’s father.

One thing that I didn’t like about this book is that Sahara isn’t always that sympathetic of a character. In fact, at times, she’s downright selfish, annoying, and immature. I think that’s also part of the reason why I would recommend it, though – it’s nice to see a book about teenage pregnancy where the girl isn’t always represented as being a fantastic teenager who made one bad mistake but is otherwise a model of perfection. Sahara isn’t made out to be a slut, either, she’s just a normal, moody, often irrational and impulsive teenager.

Planet Pregnancy was a quick read, and covered a lot more territory than you would expect, including the conflict between Sahara’s desire to have a normal adolescence and her pro-life upbringing, her original assertion to her mother that she was date raped and “isn’t pregnant”, and then her eventual (necessary) decision to tell her mother about her pregnancy. Most interesting, though, is the foray into the emotional landscape of a girl who has landed herself in a very difficult place, and is struggling to figure out what she should do. I think that most teenagers will relate to Sahara’s internal struggles, even if not to the specific problems that she’s faced with.

Rating:

2 Comments

  • zibilee June 18, 2010 at 11:33 am

    This book sounds very unusual, but I like the sound of it. It’s also nice to hear that the protagonist is a little more real than most in this situation. I am going to have to look for this one. Thanks for sharing this review!

  • Marie June 19, 2010 at 9:14 am

    sounds like a very thought-provoking read!

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