The Goddess Legacy (Review)

Title: The Goddess Legacy

Author: Aimee Carter

Publication Year: 2012

Pages: 400

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult, Short Stories, Mythology, Fantasy, Short Stories

Source: E-book version borrowed from the public library

From the cover:

Calliope/Hera represented constancy and yet had a husband who never matched her faithfulness…

Ava/Aphrodite was the goddess of love and yet commitment was a totally different deal…

Persephone was urged to marry one man, yet longed for another….

James/Hermes loved to make trouble for others, but never knew true loss before…

Henry/Hades’s solitary existence had grown too wearisome to continue. But meeting Kate Winters gave him a new hope…

(This is the collection of short stories in the Goddess Test series.)

The Goddess Legacy is sort of a cute addendum to the series. It’s a chance for some of the other characters in the series to narrate things from their perspectives, most of them events that happened long before the beginning of the series.

I particularly liked the stories from Ava and James’ perspectives. I liked both of their characters already, and getting to find out a bit of their backstory was nice. The story from Henry’s perspective, too, was interesting … if only because of getting to see his meeting and early days with Kate from the other side.

If you’re reading the rest of the series, definitely give this collection a go. It just adds depth to the characters you’re already enjoying.

Rating:

The Goddess Inheritance (Review)

Title: The Goddess Inheritance

Author: Aimee Carter

Publication Year: 2013

Pages: 304

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult, Mythology, Fantasy

Source: E-book version borrowed from the public library

From the cover:

During nine months of captivity, Kate Winters has survived a jealous goddess, a vengeful Titan and a pregnancy she never asked for. Now the Queen of the Gods wants her unborn child, and Kate can’t stop her — until Cronus offers a deal.

In exchange for her loyalty and devotion, the King of the Titans will spare humanity and let Kate keep her child. Yet even if Kate agrees, he’ll destroy Henry, her mother and the rest of council. And if she refuses, Cronus will tear the world apart until every last god and mortal is dead.

With the fate of everyone she loves resting on her shoulders, Kate must do the impossible: find a way to defeat the most powerful being in existence, even if it costs her everything.

Even if it costs her eternity.

(This is the third and final book in the Goddess Test series, after The Goddess TestThe Goddess Hunt (novella), and The Goddess Interrupted.)

After the disappointment of the last book, this one wasn’t much better. Kind of to be expected, since the major antagonist and the conflict is the same, but hey. What can I say?

I did end up liking the outcome of The Goddess Inheritance, and it felt like the journey was worth where Kate and Henry and the others end up. I just wish that Carter would have written it in some other way, with some other conflict. But maybe that’s just my personal hangup. I’ve heard that other people rather liked the Titan angle, so I might just be being too picky.

Anyways, I ended up liking the series as a whole, but definitely felt like the first book was the strongest. Up to you whether you think it’s worth a read or not.

Rating:

Goddess Interrupted (Review)

Title: Goddess Interrupted

Author: Aimee Carter

Publication Year: 2012

Pages: 304

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult, Mythology, Fantasy

Source: E-book version borrowed from the public library

From the cover:

Becoming immortal wasn’t supposed to be the easy part. Though Kate is about to be crowned Queen of the Underworld, she’s as isolated as ever. And despite her growing love for Henry, ruler of the Underworld, he’s becoming ever more distant and secretive. Then, in the midst of Kate’s coronation, Henry is abducted by the only being powerful enough to kill him: the King of the Titans.

As the other gods prepare for a war that could end them all, it is up to Kate to save Henry from the depths of Tartarus. But in order to navigate the endless caverns of the Underworld, Kate must enlist the help of the one person who is the greatest threat to her future.

Henry’s first wife, Persephone.

(This is the second book in the Goddess Test series, after The Goddess Test and The Goddess Hunt (novella).)

I didn’t really love the Titan story arc in this series. It felt kind of like a cop-out. Why couldn’t there be other problems for Kate and the other gods to deal with, rather than some ancient-as-time supposedly unbeatable pre-god god? It was just way too implausible and, to be honest, kind of annoying.

Other than that, though, the book was fine. I liked the interaction between Kate and Persephone, even though I didn’t really love Persephone as a character. I don’t know. I just felt kind of mediocre about Goddess Interrupted in general. If it wasn’t necessary to read this book to finish off the series, I’d tell you to skip it.

Rating:

The Goddess Hunt (Review)

Title: The Goddess Hunt

Author: Aimee Carter

Publication Year: 2012

Pages: 75

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult, Mythology, Fantasy

Source: E-book version borrowed from the public library

From the cover:

A vacation in Greece sounds like the perfect way for Kate Winters to spend her first sabbatical away from the Underworld…until she gets caught up in an immortal feud going back millennia. Castor and Pollux have been on the run from Zeus and Hades’s wrath for centuries, hiding from the gods who hunt them. The last person they trust is Kate, the new Queen of the Underworld. Nevertheless, she is determined to help their cause. But when it comes to dealing with immortals, Kate still has a lot to learn….

(This is a novella in the Goddess Test series, after The Goddess Test.)

I was kind of hoping that this novella would be light and fluffy, but of course not. Why would a vacation to Greece just be a vacation to Greece, especially in a series that focuses on Greek mythology in the modern world?

I kid.

Actually, I kind of liked the story here, especially since it moved away from the whole “testing if you’re worthy” thing into something a bit more exciting. I also liked the growing relationship between Kate and James, and the way that we got to finally see how Henry feels about Kate through the bits he narrated. It’s a fun little bridge between The Goddess Test and Goddess Interrupted, fleshing out the series and the characters a bit, but nothing overwhelmingly awesome.

Rating:

The Goddess Test (Review)

Title: The Goddess Test

Author: Aimee Carter

Publication Year: 2011

Pages: 304

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult, Mythology, Fantasy

Source: E-book version borrowed from the public library

From the cover:

It’s always been just Kate and her mom — and her mother is dying. Her last wish? To move back to her childhood home. So Kate’s going to start at a new school with no friends, no other family and the fear her mother won’t live past the fall.

Then she meets Henry. Dark. Tortured. And mesmerizing. He claims to be Hades, god of the Underworld — and if she accepts his bargain, he’ll keep her mother alive while Kate tries to pass seven tests.

Kate is sure he’s crazy — until she sees him bring a girl back from the dead. Now saving her mother seems crazily possible. If she succeeds, she’ll become Henry’s future bride, and a goddess.

A long time ago, when I was in high school, I had a bit of an obsession with Greek mythology and ancient Greece in general. I’m not really sure where it came from originally, but it was helped along in large part due to – don’t laugh – the television series Hercules and, later, Xena: Warrior Princess. Yes, really. For quite a while, I read or watched anything I could get my hands on that dealt with Greece, and then in my first year of university, I moved on without a second’s thought and never looked back.

So when I found out about this series, I decided to give it a try. The Goddess Test was just about what I expected: a story set in the modern world, with elements of mythology tied in. In this case, it was the gods themselves that were the “tie in”, each of them taking on modern names and personae, and somehow continuing to exist in a world that no longer believes in them.

For the most part, I found the book interesting enough. I liked Kate and some of the other characters – James (Hermes) and Ava (Aphrodite) mostly – and the story kept me pretty entertained. I both liked and disliked the concepts of the “tests” that Kate had to go through. It was nice that it wasn’t the typical “run the gauntlet” kind of play-by-play for all of them, but then … at other times, it felt like the less-obvious tests were a bit of a cop-out. Plus, there’s the whole mystery as to who’s been killing off all the possible options Henry’s had over the years. That part, to me, was probably the most interesting part of the story.

I wanted to like Henry’s character, but I often found him aloof and frustrating. I know that Carter was just trying to show how he might react to having lost the love of his life, Persephone, and how he would be overly cautious about getting attached to anyone else after so many girls had died trying to pass the tests … but it didn’t make his character any less annoying when he did it.

Overall, I enjoyed The Goddess Test, even with its flaws. It was a good start to the series and made me want to continue reading to see how everything would end up with all of the characters.

Rating:

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