Reading Roots: Ash from English Major Junk Food
blogger interviews , interviews / July 6, 2010

Posted weekly on Tuesdays, Reading Roots features a variety of book bloggers talking about their early reading influences and experiences, letting us catch a glimpse of the “roots” that each person has built upon in forming their identity as “a reader”. Today, I’m interviewing Ash from English Major Junk Food. Let’s explore her reading roots! What is your earliest memory involving books or reading? How were books, reading, and literacy approached in your childhood home? Were your parents or other family members “readers”? When I was a kid I went to my grandparent’s house every day before and after school before my parents came to pick me up. When I was in preschool I couldn’t wait to learn how to read so my grandma taught me how. She read Little Red Riding Hood to me and then I would try to read it to her. We sat in this old blue recliner in her living room and finally I figured out how to read the book. After the I was unstoppable. I started to read to my grandma before and after school and eventually I would read her the newspaper or chapters from whatever book I was reading. Did you…

Reading Roots: Mystica of Musings from Sri Lanka
blogger interviews , interviews / June 29, 2010

Posted weekly on Tuesdays, Reading Roots features a variety of book bloggers talking about their early reading influences and experiences, letting us catch a glimpse of the “roots” that each person has built upon in forming their identity as “a reader”. Today, I’m interviewing Mystica of Musings from Sri Lanka. Let’s explore her reading roots! What is your earliest memory involving books or reading? How were books, reading, and literacy approached in your childhood home? Were your parents or other family members “readers”? Its strange as no one in the family were readers. I was an only child till I was 16 years old and maybe that was why books became so very important to me. Did you enjoy language arts/English classes as a kid, or were you more of a reluctant reader? When did you first consider yourself “a reader”? I loved the English language as a child and even at the 16 offered it as a subject both as language and literature in what I think americans call high school. In Sri Lanka we have Advanced Level which is a pre university entrance exam and we get to choose four subjects which we could specialise in. English literature…

Reading Roots: Jennifer from Girls Gone Reading
blogger interviews , interviews / June 22, 2010

Posted weekly on Tuesdays, Reading Roots features a variety of book bloggers talking about their early reading influences and experiences, letting us catch a glimpse of the “roots” that each person has built upon in forming their identity as “a reader”. Today, I’m interviewing Jennifer from Girls Gone Reading. Let’s explore her reading roots! What is your earliest memory involving books or reading? How were books, reading, and literacy approached in your childhood home? Were your parents or other family members “readers”? My parents are avid readers, and books take over every room in my parents’ home. We frequently went to the book store and the library, and my parents read to us every chance they could. My dad actually taught himself to speak and read English better by reading the classics. Grandpa was a migrant worker, and my dad only spoke Spanish when he started school. He was put in the remedial class and told he was stupid. He instantly decided that he didn’t like that, so he learned from his classmates, teachers, etc. but he also scraped together every penny he had to join a Book of the Month club-Classics based. We still have these books that he…

Reading Roots: Amy from Amy Reads
blogger interviews , interviews / June 15, 2010

In my job as a high school teacher, I spend a lot of time thinking about how few teenagers I see reading for pleasure. On the surface, this deeply saddens me, since I always found such enjoyment in reading when I was younger. Beyond that, though, is something even more sobering – I wonder how the reading habits of this generation are going to affect their literacy levels and success later on in life. It fascinates me to investigate the factors that make a child into “a reader” instead of turning them away from books once they are no longer forced to read for school. I’ve often wondered if we can use these factors to our advantage in encouraging kids to be readers. It was these thoughts that brought me to deciding to start this (new) weekly feature, called Reading Roots. I’ve decided to interview a variety of book bloggers about their early reading influences and experiences, and share their answers so that we can all catch a glimpse of the “roots” that each person has built upon in forming their identity as “a reader”. Today, I’m kicking off the series by interviewing Amy from Amy Reads. She writes one…

Armchair BEA: Interview with Tif Talks Books

Since I – ever so sadly – cannot attend Book Expo America and the Book Blogger Convention in New York City this week, I’ve decided to join in on a new event … Armchair BEA! Those of us who are participating in Armchair BEA are essentially putting together our own book blogger convention from the comfort of our own homes (or workplaces or wherever else we’ll be). You can read more about Armchair BEA here. In the spirit of networking, today’s Armchair BEA posts are largely blogger interviews! You can mosey on over to 133ov to read the interview that Vasilly had with me, or over to the main event page to find links to all the other blogger interviews that are being posted today. Quote from Armchair BEA Central: One aspect of BEA and BBC that truly makes the event worthwhile is the opportunity to meet blogging friends face-to-face and get to know them outside of the blogging world.  However, just because we are not able to truly meet each other in real life, that does not mean we cannot get to know one another better! Today, I have the pleasure of introducing Tif Talks Books here on my…